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AM's popularity and far-reaching capabilities were used by the government to launch a civil defense system, CONELRAD ("CONtrol of ELectromagnetic RADiation,") the forerunner of the Emergency Broadcast System (now Emergency Alert System,) in 1951.

(WRR engineer Rick Teddlie co-created the CONELRAD system.) While the nuclear threat of the Cold War prompted the dedication of a national broadcast frequency, it wasn't until 1958 that the system was first used for weather alerts.

By the early 1970s, however, listeners were slowly discovering the FM band and migrated to it for its static-free, stereophonic broadcasts; by 1978, FM overtook AM as the most popular band.

Attempts to revitalize AM have netted little; AM Stereo was proposed in 1958 and introduced in 1982 to big fanfare; many car manufacturers began to integrate AM Stereo into their radio units, and KRQX-570 became the first local AM Stereo station in 1983.

) AM started out as a freewheeling, 'throw up a transmitter and go with it' gamut of radio waves in its earliest days, with a couple of assigned frequencies (833 kc [primarily news and weather] and 618.6 kc [primarily music.]) and virtually no rules to allow a fair distribution of the dial for broadcasters.

(By mid-1922, all five DFW stations agreed to a timesharing plan on each frequency.) November 11, 1928 was declared "National Frequency Allocation Day," when the Federal Radio Commission (FRC, predecessor to the FCC) brought organization to the dial by assigning dedicated frequencies to the strongest stations, and culling out many of the small-time opportunists who weren't serious about broadcasting.

Kahn Communications is working on improvements to their original AM Stereo concept. Format: Southern Gospel (1986-90,) Black Christian Gospel (1990-5/18/1998,) Spanish/Ethnic/Spanish Religious (5/18/1998-2004; as "La Poderosa," 2004-present.) Calls stand for exas.

With the introduction of television to the masses in the late 1940s, radio's demise was assumed to be imminent.The invention of the transistor, and subsequently the development of lightweight, portable radios, along with the inclusion of radios in cars, helped the reinvented band find a new audience with people on the go.Mc Lendon and Todd Storz's simultaneous discovery of the "Top 40" in the 1950s gave radio a special popularity among the younger generation, and his KLIF, along with KBOX and KFJZ, developed formats to capitalize on current music, especially rock and roll.Whether you knock AM radio today for its relentless static or its lack of music, this is where it all began.The early 20th century brought the first radio stations to the Dallas-Fort Worth area: KFJZ (with roots dating back to 1917,) WRR (in 1920,) WPA, WBAP and WFAA (all in 1922,) and the rest is history (well, almost!

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