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A previous acquaintance with the subject is needful for the thorough enjoyment of pantomimic action, though the rule has not always been acted upon either in ancient or modern times, and in some instances been mistaken altogether. The sisters taunt her, but Cinderella can scarcely conceal her joy. The script is available on Readex Fiche, without musical score.]Cinderella: A Pantomime: An accurate description of the grand allegorical pantomimic spectacle of Cinderella, as performed at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane; to which is added, A critique on the performance and performers by a lover of the drama, together with the story of Cinderella.

Serious pantomimes were once as frequent as comic; and it is recorded that they were occasionally found so pathetic that both actors and audiences were equally affected. She produces the other slipper, hugs it, and sings an "Air." Sc. The Prince anxiously awaits in hope that the right woman will appear.

At Drury Lane, Grimaldi performed “Cinderella”, however, a critic dubbed his song and performance as “base,” and Grimaldi left Drury Lane in the fall of 1805 (98). The Nymph warns Cinderella about midnight, she enters the carriage and goes to the palace. The Prince sees Cinderella in the dress of his dream and is enchanted. The sisters return and the announcement of the Prince's search is made. She forgives the sisters and introduces them to two noblemen. The story, which follows the critique is based on Samber's translation of Perrault, where after the first night at the ball Cinderella asks Charlotte for one of her dresses but is denied and mocked as "Cinderbreech" for playing "Miss Pert." Another edition of this work was published in 1808.]. The pantomime is in manuscript, a part of the Larpent collection, no. The manuscript is five pages long and includes 14 scenes of dialogue and choruses, in couplets. Recitative by Cinderella on her scullery work, her "doom." Sc. The Baron receives news of the ball and reads the invitation that admits the Baron, his lady, and her two daughters. 5 Finetta punishes Cinderella for spurning her command. The Baroness sides with the Fairy godmother's scolding of Cinderella. He takes a nap and Fairy Butterfly gives him a vision of Cinderella. Pedro, on his way to shave the Baron, repeatedly answers the door for the Milkman, the Baker, Butcher, and then the Postman, who presents an invitation to the Prince's Ball. Produced at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden 1875-76. George), Papillion, Queen Butterfly (Miss Emma Walters), Cinderella (Miss Amelia), Salprunella (Mr.

Disher notes that this version of the folklore tale was “strangely perverted” considering Venus, instead of the fairy godmother, is responsible for Cinderella’s eventual triumph. He decorates her with a scarf and diamond ring as tokens of his love. Cinderella is in rags as the Prince's men pass by. The critique and its publication have been ascribed to Mr. He notes that the grandeur and magnificance of the grand tale has rarely been equalled, never excelled to the infinite credit of the ballet. Characters: Prince Calidore, afterwards Harlequin; Baron Pomposini, afterwards Pantaloon; Pedro, his servant, in love with Cinderella and afterwards Dandinee; the Baroness, afterwards Clown; Clotilda and Tabitha, two sisters; Cinderella, afterwards Columbine; Finetta, the Fairy Godmother to Cinderella. But Finetta drives them all away, informing the Prince that Cinderella was the beautiful maiden at the ball that he so loved, and transforming Cinderella into Columbine, the Prince into Harlequin, the Baroness into a clown, the Baron into Pantaloon, and Pedro "thou poor enamour'd loon" into Dandinee; that is, until the lost slipper be found. 14, where Finetta announces: "The slipper found, your task is o'er, / The pow'r to punish, is no more--/ But in Finetta's Temple, this pair shall prove / The joys that wait on constant love! [See also Lacy's Acting Edition under Opera, below, which includes stage directions absent from this edition. Joseph Wood), Baron Pumpolino of Montefiesco (Penson), Alidoro the Prince's Tutor (Stansbury), Dandini the Prince's Valet (Morley), Pedro the Baron's servant (Keeley), Cinderella (Miss Mary Ann Paton), Clorinda and Thisbe, daughters of the Baron (Cawse and Hughes), the Fairy Queen (Miss H. 3: A trio, suggesting a plot akin to Rossini's opening scene, with Clorinda and Thisbe complaining about dress, hair, joy, etc. The Prince laments some "Demon's opposing malice," as the chorus comments on his raging passion. Bigwiggo awakens him, after checking his large clock, but he would rather dream of her face. Cinderella appears and the Baron slaps her and so do the sisters. More work for Cinderella, though Pedro is sympathetic and helps. The Prince arrives with the slipper, though Clotilda and the Baron rage, the Prince discovers Cinderella in an instant. " The Fairy Godmother then invites everyone to see the "Grand Transformation Scene, entitled A Fairy's Wedding," with dances by the Orange Blossoms and Forget-me-nots in the Land of Purity and Truth; then the Harlequinade dancers.], by Charles Rice (1819-1880).

There are numerous illustrations and photographs of various harlequins throughout the history of theatre.] (1860 at the Royal Strand) the sisters came into full ugliness and Buttoni makes his first appearance. Clorinda and Thisbe become increasingly abusive of Cinderella. The Baron awakens to the commotion, disclaiming the noisy daughters, and tells, as in , his dream of the ascending Jack-ass. In Rossini's duet they question each other and fall in love. Presumably, the people have in the meantime arrived at the Grand Ball.

In 1895, at Drury Lane, Cinderella set out to the Ball in an "automotor carriage encrusted with incandescent jewels." In 1883-84 her slippers are made of "toughened glass." Frow discusses uses of advertising in pantomimes and popular songs, sex, domestic animals, and spectacular devices to attract audiences. Presumably Dandini disguised as the Prince extends the invitation to the ball. In a "Dialogued Quartett" the sisters flirt with Dandini, thinking he is the Prince, and Dandini reveals to the Baron his valet status.

Pantomime works frequently cite his scholarly interest in the genre, but I have not yet been able to identify specific works by Brown devoted to the subject.] [The first mention of Cinderella occurs in Chapter VI, which focuses on Joseph Grimaldi. A grand dress descends from the clouds and fixes on Pedro. The Palace Ballroom, with splendid banquet and music. As they do so the Prince comes with the slipper, various candidates try it on, for ludicrous effect. The Prince looks into her face lovingly and the slipper fits. The Nymph enters, Hymen attends with his torch, and the Prince and Cinderella kneel at the altar and are made happy. The application for permission to perform is registered with the Lord Chamberlain by John Fawcett 20 March 1820, with performance at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, beginning 22 March 1820. Finetta the godmother appears, and tells "Moth and gaudy Fly" to fetch the pumpkin, trap with dappled mice, the sleek , fat, "old grey whisker'd Rat" in the barn, "six dainty Lizards green," and changes Cinderella's dress for the ball, with glass slippers to crown all. Finetta warns Cinderella about the midnight deadline when she must "be at home." Sc. The Prince prefers bumpers of wine to logarithms and double equations. Fairy Serena appears instantly, and with three wand waves transforms Cinderella's garb. Summarizes the numerous names for the Baron, the sisters, and the Prince.] ["The composition of pantomimes, notwithstanding a vulgar notion to the contrary, has of late days greatly improved. Cinderella asks if she might go, if only for an hour. In the days of ' Mother Goose' they made no claim to a literary status. The Baron mocks her in a "concerted piece" from in which Alidoro asks after the third daughter, Angelina. As in Rossini's opera the quintette sings of their uncertainty and doubt. `The Royal Shepherd of Mount Ida' was the favourite subject with the ancient theatres - the audiences of Greece and Rome were entertained with the Shepherd, the Mountain, and the Apple, all of which were to them intelligible objects, and, therefore, especially suitable to pantomimic exhibition. The same principle was extended in the middle ages, and is still in Italy and Spain to the Mysteries and Moralities, and the dramas that are statedly acted in Catholic churches. An air welcomes Venus and the chorus sings "for ever and for ever" as a dance concludes the play. The pantomime was originally produced at Drury Lane, January, 1804.

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